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Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

Lemon Honey Rosemary Chicken

Friday, May 8th, 2015
img_3369-610x300Ingredients
  • 2 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 teaspoons fine sea salt
  • ⅓ cup olive oil
  • ⅓ cup lemon juice (juice of 2 lemons)
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons dijon mustard
  • ⅛ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 4-5 rosemary sprigs
  • spinach, to garnish
  • chopped fresh parsley, to garnish
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2. Sprinkle salt on top of all chicken thighs. Arrange chicken thighs in an 8×8 baking sheet.
  3. Whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, honey, mustard, pepper and red pepper flakes. Pour mixture on top of chicken, pressing the chicken down into the mixture to cover as much as possible.
  4. Press rosemary sprigs in the dish throughout.
  5. Bake for 25 minutes or until no pink remains in chicken.
  6. Eat with some spinach or arugula. Garnish with fresh parsley

The Best Homemade Ranch Dressing Ever, and it’s Paleo!

Monday, April 27th, 2015
paleoranchdressingIngredients
  1. 1/2 cup Paleo mayo (see below)
  2. 1/2 cup coconut milk
  3. 1/2 tsp onion powder
  4. 1 tsp garlic powder
  5. 1 tsp dill
  6. Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
Whisk all ingredients together to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week.
Mayo recipe
  1. 1 egg, room temperature
  2. 2 tbsp lemon juice or apple cider vinegar
  3. 1/2 tsp salt
  4. 1/2 tsp dry mustard
  5. 1 cup light olive oil*
  6. In a tall glass (if using an immersion blender) or a blender, place the egg and lemon juice. Let come to room temperature, about one hour. Add the salt and mustard. Blend ingredients. While blending, very slowly pour in the olive oil. Blend until it reaches desired consistency. Store in the refrigerator for up to a week.
  7. *It’s important to use a light olive oil, not full flavor, for mayonnaise. You could also use almond or walnut oil instead.

Marinated Flank Steak

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

flank_steak_marinadeWith a few slight modifications to make it Paleo, this recipe is almost completely lifted from allrecipes.com. It’s unbelievably delicious and totally okay with me if you lick the plate.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup high smoke point Paleo oil (I recommend avocado oil; EVOO has too low a smoke point and coconut oil is okay but a bit heavy and strong-flavored for this)
  • 1/3 cup gluten-free tamari
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon prepared mustard
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 pounds flank steak

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix the oil, tamari, vinegar, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, garlic, and ground black pepper. Place meat in a shallow baking dish or zip lock baggie. Pour marinade over the steak, turning meat to coat thoroughly. Cover/seal, and refrigerate for around 6 hours.

Oil and preheat grill at medium-high. Remove steak from marinade and grill 5 minutes per side, or until done as you like.

Dave’s Turkey

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

davesturkeyThis is an easy, delicious, kid and party friendly main course that I’ve been making just about once a week for ages. I think I blogged it here three or four years ago here, but it’s worth reposting; it’s that good!

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp gluten-free tamari
  • 2 Tbsp chicken broth
  • 1  1/4 tsp arrowroot
  • 1 to 1.25 lbs. ground chicken or turkey
  • 2 Tbsp walnut oil
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh ginger
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 small to medium red bell pepper, small dice
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onion
  • 3 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro

Combine tamari, chicken broth, and arrowroot. Place meat in a bowl, separate into a half dozen or so chunks, and pour in mixture over to briefly marinate, about 10-15 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat a large, deep skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add oils, swirl to coat, then add ginger, garlic, and red bell pepper. Cook about 1 minute, stirring often.

Next add the meat, crumble, and spread evenly along cooking surface. Cook 1 minute or until meat begins to brown. Turn to cook similarly on other side, breaking meat up further as you go.When meat is cooked through and very crumbly, add green onion and cilantro. Mix well.

Serve over shredded lettuce which can be combined with spinach chiffonade. Great with pan-seared asparagus.

Asian Pork Tenderloin

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

asian_marinade_porkProbably because I spend more time perusing Paleo food blogs than shopping for shoes, my browser entices me with primally-tailored ads. A recent one beckoned me with the line “eat like your ancestors” while showing a historic photo of a pioneer woman next to fast food products the ad claimed my great great grandmother would have shopped for. I think they’re missing the point. I do appreciate that somewhere in the commercial food world, someone wants to save me time in the kitchen with something healthier than chicken nuggets, but truth is, with a little planning, I can quickly make my own fast food that I know my great great grandmother would have loved to eat. Here’s one of my favorites:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pound pork tenderloin
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free tamari
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 4 scallions, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger

Directions

Mix marinade ingredients together and place into a zip-lock bag along with raw meat. Let marinate for 3 to 4 hours.

Preheat oven to 450°. Remove meat from baggie and place on rack over a foil-lined pan.

When oven temp has reached 450, place meat in oven and reduce temperature to 350°. Cook until internal temperature of meat, when tested with a digital thermometer, reaches 135–140° – about 30 minutes for a one-and-a-half pound tenderloin.

When meat is done, remove from oven and let stand for about 5 to 10 minutes. Slice and serve.

Savory Lemonade

Friday, March 6th, 2015

savory_lemonadeFor the most part, I’m happy drinking just plain water. And not that water isn’t fun, but every now and then, I find myself looking for something that’s, well, more fun.

Grocery stores in recent years have started to vend some natural low and no sugar products such as coconut water*, Honest Tea, and Hint Water to name a few. Great choices, Paleo, but store-bought healthy habits can still have a downside; these drinks can be pricy if you find yourself reaching for one several times a week.

So I’ve been playing around with spicing up homemade lemonade to avoid added sugar and have come up with a couple combinations that are distinctive, healthy, and fun in that something other than just-plain-water sort of way.

Ingredients

  • One 10-ounce glass of water
  • 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • one smidgen (1/32) teaspoon one of following: powdered cumin, powdered cardamom, powdered cinnamon, or salt

Directions

Combine, stir, and enjoy!

*A note about coconut water: As long as there is no added sugar, coconut water’s sugar content is mostly glucose which is fine, metabolically speaking.

Paleo Baking Powder

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

baking_powderLike cornstarch, baking powder is one of those small ingredients that’s easy to overlook. Most commercial versions contain cornstarch as the filler that keeps the base (sodium bicarbonate) and the acid (usually sodium aluminum phosphate) from reacting with each other while stored on your shelf. But it’s very easy to make your own thus avoiding the cornstarch and ingredients that have the word “aluminum” in them and give baking a metallic taste.

So this week’s recipe is simply how to make your own healthier, better tasting baking powder for immediate use or longer term storage as follows:

Ingredients

  • one part baking soda
  • two parts cream of tartar (a natural substance made in the fermentation process of grapes)
  • one part arrowroot – optional if you plan to make enough to store for future use

Directions

If you are only making enough for a one-time immediate use, just mix the appropriate amounts of baking soda and cream of tartar together to meet your need. Substitute evenly for any recipe that calls for baking powder.

If you wish to scale up and store about a half cup of BP for future use, then mix 1/4 cup cream of tartar with 2 tablespoons baking soda and 2 tablespoons arrowroot. The latter will extend the shelf life of your leavening for up to 3 months. After this amount of time, it would be wise to test the efficacy of the baking powder before using it by placing a half teaspoon in a small bowl and then pouring about a quarter cup of boiling water over the powder. If it bubbles happily, it is still good.

Don’t Overlook the Little Things

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

chocolate_puddingWhen going to the trouble of cooking Paleo or if you’re just trying to make sure that what you eat is as free from weird junk as possible, make sure you don’t overlook the little things.

One example is cornstarch. When a recipe calls for this as a thickener, arrowroot usually makes a great Paleo substitute. Cornstarch is a highly processed “food” that always involves prolonged chemical exposures and almost always is a GMO. Pure arrowroot powder, on the other hand, is milled pretty much the same today as it was ancestrally and is something that, unlike cornstarch, you could make pretty easily at home if you wished.

Arrowroot can be used as a Paleo alternative to cornstarch or flour in cooking as long as what you are using it in is non-dairy (can become slimy in milk) and will not be exposed to heat for a prolonged period of time as arrowroot loses it’s thickening power at extended high temperatures. When substituting for cornstarch, it’s an even exchange. When using arrowroot as an alternative to flour, use half as much arrowroot as flour.

A few other things to know about arrowroot: It will clump up when added directly to liquids so it is recommended that you mix it into a small quantity of your liquid before stirring it into the main pot, so to speak. And when purchasing arrowroot, be on the lookout for additives as some manufacturers combine it with potato starch.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups coconut milk or nut milk of choice
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons arrowroot
  • 3 large egg yolks

Directions

Put 1 1/2 cups of the milk, the honey, vanilla extract, cocoa and salt into a saucepan set over medium-high heat. Bring to a simmer, then remove pan from heat.

Meanwhile, whisk the remaining 1/2 cup of the milk, arrowroot, and egg yolks together in a bowl. Gradually whisk the hot chocolate milk into the egg mixture.

Return to the saucepan and cook over medium-high heat stirring constantly until the pudding comes to a full boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer, and continue stirring until thick, about a minute or two more.

Pour the pudding into approximately 6 small serving bowls; I like to use sake cups or shot glasses. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until set – 4 hours to overnight.

Baby Kale

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

baby_kaleOne of the highlights of winter season vegetables is the abundance of beautiful kale which is a cold weather crop. Especially wonderful is finding baby kale greens at the farmer’s market or grocery store and frying it up in this perfect recipe from Bobby Flay:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds young kale, stems and leaves coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup vegetable stock or water
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider or red wine vinegar

Directions
Heat olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until soft; do not burn.

Increase temperature to high, add the stock and kale and toss to combine. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.

Remove cover and continue to cook, stirring until all the liquid has evaporated.

Season with salt and pepper to taste and add vinegar.

Fast Food Paleo

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

aidellsIn a perfect Paleo world, you’d hunt it, skin it, gut it, maybe cook it, and then eat it. Ideally, the next best thing would be to work with ingredients that are as close to their natural state as possible. But if time, space or permit issues are limited for any of the above, there are occasions when thoughtful hunting in a grocery store will reward you with fast-food Paleo time savers.

As I rely on Aidells sausage for a quick post-workout protein blast, I did a little research to find out which of their flavors might be Paleo approved and stumbled on this informative site to help guide me to guilt-free convenience.

Here’s an idea for a 1-dish-1-pot single serving meal in under 10 minutes:

Ingredients

  • 1 Aidell Chicken Apple Sausage (or other Paleo-friendly sausage of choice) sliced into bite-sized rounds
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 zucchini, halved and sliced
  • 1/4 cup loosely chopped red onion
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Drizzle about a tablespoon of olive oil into a small frying pan set on medium-high heat. Add sausage and brown, about a minute or two.

Remove sausage from pan. Reduce heat to medium-low, and add more oil if necessary to cook garlic for about a minute.

Return heat to medium-high. Add zucchini and onion, and stir-fry until soft, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Return sausage to pan, and stir with rest of ingredients until everything is piping hot. S & p to taste, and serve.