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Archive for April, 2014

Let’s talk about handstands!

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Have you seen the individual regional workouts?  They were just announced and our girl Amanda is going to crush it!!  We can’t wait to cheer you on.  Since handstands are making an appearance at regionals, I’ve reposted part of an article Roger wrote about handstands below.  A refresher never hurts, enjoy.

Beginning handstands

Many people will be intimidated simply by the concept of doing a handstand. Fears of falling and/or not being able to support themselves with their arms will be the primary hindrances early on. Proper positioning and a gradual progression will take trainees through this process safely and quickly.

The first step to a handstand is simply to learn how to be comfortable in a hand support. A vertical handstand is not necessary to start this process. Start with a folded panel mat, plyo box, or other stable raised surface. Stand in a shallow lunge in front of the object with arms overhead. In the lunge, the rear leg is the kicking leg, and the front leg is the support leg. Place your hands on the object, and kick your rear leg up toward the ceiling so that the support leg comes off the ground only a few inches. Start small. Getting up into a handstand at this point is not necessary and not recommended.

This initial stage can tell you a lot about the handstand and you can begin to improve handstand technique. The first thing to look for is proper shoulder angle. Many people will push their shoulders forward past their hands. This creates a very unstable position unless the individual performing the handstand is capable of performing a planche. The shoulders should be completely open and active with the arms by the ears. The head should be positioned so that your hands are just visible by looking toward them with your eyes (not moving your whole head). If you can see two feet past your fingertips then your head is too far out and your shoulder angle likely is “broken.” Once the proper position has been established, work on kicking higher. If the handstand is approaching 45 degrees from vertical it is time to move off of the raised surface.

Before moving to a handstand on the ground, you should be very comfortable with forward rolls. A forward roll is the easiest and safest way to exit a handstand that falls forward. Training a forward roll is discussed in detail in CrossFit Journal issue 38.

Proper shoulder angle for a handstandProper shoulder angle for a handstandProper shoulder angle for a handstand
Proper shoulder angle.
Improper shoulder angle for a handstandImproper shoulder angle for a handstand
Improper shoulder angle.

Practicing a handstand on the ground may be the starting point for individuals who already have a solid base level of strength and kinesthetic awareness. The starting point is the same as it was for the raised object. Start in a shallow lunge with arms overhead. Kick to a handstand by lunging forward and kicking your rear leg up toward the ceiling. The kick is what brings the hands to the floor, not reaching down with the hands. A very common mistake is to reach down with the hands, which breaks the shoulder angle and creates a less stable position. The line from wrists to the rear leg should be kept straight. When starting to kick to handstand, the kick should be kept low. As with the handstand drill on a box, only a small kick is necessary to identify deficiencies in the position. Once proper positions have been demonstrated, the kick can be taken higher. Simply kicking up and stepping back down repeatedly will begin to bring the hips higher in each kick and train an understanding of the shoulder and arm push required to hold a handstand. Once the kick leg is reaching vertical, the support leg can be brought up to meet it in the handstand.

Proper arm position in a lungeImproper arm position in a lunge
Proper and improper shoulder angles.

Holding a handstand and improving alignment Once a kick to handstand is consistent, shift focus to holding the handstand. The only way to improve your ability to hold a handstand is to practice handstands. Do handstands whenever you get a chance. This is comparable to learning to walk. When children learn to walk they practice constantly. This is the same approach that should be taken with handstands. A solid static handstand is essential to performing free standing handstand push ups. Handstands can be practiced against a wall to develop strength in the position and to allow for enough time in the handstand to play with body alignment. Handstands against a wall should be practiced both with the back to the wall and facing the wall.

Handstands facing away from the wall do not encourage a proper hollow handstand posture, but allow for practicing balance in a handstand. Start in a lunge facing the wall and kick to handstand so that your heels hit the wall. Be sure to place your fingertips only a couple of inches away from the wall. Start the lunge far enough away from the wall so that you have to stretch forward a bit as you kick to the handstand. This will force a better alignment in the shoulders and improve the mechanics of the kick. This also creates proper positions for other kicking skills such as front handsprings and round offs. Once in the handstand, the shoulders should be pushed up (toward the ears) as far as possible and fully extended. There should be no angle between the shoulders and torso. The line between wrists and toes should be as straight as possible. Once the handstand is aligned properly, push with your fingertips and try to pull your heels away from the wall slightly to hold the handstand. As you get more stable you can walk your hands farther away from the wall to practice your balance.

Handstand facing away from the wall, proper position Handstand facing away from the wall, improper position
Correct Incorrect - hands too far from wall

Practicing handstands facing the wall helps to ensure a proper hollow handstand position but does not allow for balance practice as readily as facing away from the wall does. To get into a handstand facing the wall start with your back to the wall, bend down and place your hands on the floor 1 to 2 feet away from the wall, then walk your feet up the wall as you walk your hands in to the wall. Try to get your hands as close as possible to the wall. Your toes should be pointed and the tops of your feet should be the only thing touching the wall. It is possible to do this with your wrists virtually touching the wall assuming handstand alignment is good. Proper alignment is an open hollow with shoulders fully extended and pushed up. Think about pushing your toes as high toward the ceiling as possible. Once this position is obtained, try to push away from the wall slightly and transfer your weight to your fingertips and hold the handstand.

Handstand facing the wall, proper position

Practice freestanding handstands as often as possible. Kick up to a handstand whenever you get a chance. When you kick to handstand, think about extending your lunge, keeping your shoulders open, and maintaining a straight line between your kick heel and your hands. Part of your practice should be just trying to stay on your hands no matter what it takes. Walk, break form and bend your arms, just stay in the handstand. As you spend time in the handstand you will begin to feel the adjustments that are necessary to maintain it.

In addition to practicing handstands allowing for walking, you should also make a concerted effort to practice static handstands. Kick into a handstand with a tight, straight body and don’t move. If you have to take a step, come down and try again. As with previous handstands, kick into the handstand with an extended body and shoulders. Once in the handstand squeeze your legs together, extend your shoulders so that they are completely open, and hold the body in a straight, slightly hollow position. Think about digging your fingertips into the floor while practicing static handstands. This will create a more solid base for the handstand. Think about leaning the handstand slightly forward, as it is easier to save a handstand that is falling forward (over onto your back) than it is to save a handstand falling backward. (The exception to this is on rings.) To save a handstand that is falling forward, extend through your shoulders and dig your fingers into the floor as hard as you can. To save a handstand falling backward pike your shoulders and hips and if necessary bend your arms. As the handstand gets stronger, a slight planche will save a handstand that is falling backward.

Proper handstand alignment Improper handstand alignment
Correct Incorrect

This article continues to discuss free standing handstand pushups. To view this entire article please visit: http://www.drillsandskills.com/article/19

This Week’s Happenings in The Cave!

Monday, April 28th, 2014

cave_client-bbq6_webCave Community BBQ
The Cave is hosting a Client Appreciation BBQ event on May 3rd from 1:00-7:00PM.  All are welcome to attend, though we will be paying extra special attention to our CrossFit community! They have worked very hard this year and deserve some home cookin’ and some fun!
If you’re looking to show off your awesome paleo (or non-paleo) cooking skills, you’re in luck for this is a pot-luck event.  The Cave will provide the bulk of the food and drink, but feel free to bring a dish to share! Come prepared to participate in some fun games and contests for prizes.  Who doesn’t love an old fashioned water balloon toss or three legged race? It is important to note that The Cave will NOT be providing child care at this event, however, children are welcome to attend. We hope to see you there!

Challenge WOD

Thanks to Coach Bo, the Challenge WOD is back and better than ever! This time around the in-house competition will consist of 6 workouts, each running for 2 weeks. At the conclusion of the 6 workouts, a winner will be chosen for Top Male and Top Female athletes. Read more about it here!

Whole Life Challenge

The Whole Life Challenge is a game/contest started by CrossFit LA. designed to help people make positive lifestyle changes by using accountability.  If you would like to participate in this challenge, sign up by going to our team page at:   http://www.whole.lc/wlcsummer14/pt/thecave. We’ve had Cavers do the WLC before with great success.  Be sure to share this with your friends — they do not have to be Cavers to participate, nor do they have to be fitness nuts.  There are varying levels of participation.  Inviting friends to participate in the WLC with you may be a good way to get them thinking about their health and fitness without the full level of commitment of joining The Cave.

Fantastic Acrobatic AcroYoga Workshop

May 18th 1:00 - 3:30PM

Combining partner yoga, partner acrobatics, and healing arts, AcroYoga helps build strength, confidence and trust.  Who wants to be fantastic when you could be Acrotastic?!  This workshop is guaranteed to make you work hard and gain skills while having a blast!  Come learn the ways and leave happy!  Space is limited so please register early!   AcroYoga beginner and intermediate levels welcome.

AcroYoga is an incredibly fun way to bust through fears, build trust in one’s abilities, form powerful friendships and large amounts of confidence. Crystal Hatzimichael is both an experienced AcroYoga teacher and a Thai Yoga Massage Therapist. Reserve your space now by e-mailing crystal@inthecave.com or calling (415)927-1630. $35

summer-parkour-campsfinal-1

Summer Camps

If you like the idea of keeping the kids healthily active during the summer (while giving parents a few hours break),  check out our Summer Camp schedule below!  Then be sure to register NOW as these classes fill up FAST!

Summer Camps:


Challenge WOD Is Back!

Sunday, April 27th, 2014
Challenge WOD is back and better than ever! This time around the in-house competition will consist of 6 workouts, each running for 2 weeks. At the conclusion of the 6 workouts, a winner will be chosen for Top Male and Top Female athletes. Winners will be inducted into the Challenge WOD Hall of Fame and given “The Prize”. Competitors that complete all 6 workouts will also receive a prize.
Rules for Challenge WOD are as follows:
1)  All competitors must perform all movements as specified in the standards for each workout. Standards will be posted to the blog before the workout period begins.  There will be no scaling allowed.
2)  All workouts must be completed between the Monday that the workout is released and the second Sunday.
3)  All submissions must be performed with a judge.  The judge must also be a Challenge WOD competitor.
4)  The athlete may perform the workout as many times as they wish.
5)  Scores will be assessed in the same manner as the CrossFit Games Open. At the end of each workout period, competitors will be ranked by their scores on the workout, then assigned points based on their ranking.  For example, 2nd place will receive 2 points, 10th will receive 10 points. At the end of the competition the athlete with the least points wins.
6)  CrossFit coaches are allowed to compete but will not be considered when a winner is chosen.
7)  Challenge Wod Hall of Fame inductees are allowed to compete but will not be considered when a winner is chosen.
The first workout for Challenge WOD Spring 2014 is as follows:
For time:
20 thrusters 43/30KG
30 pull ups
40 wall ball 20# 10ft./14# 9ft.
50 cal. row
Standards:
Bill With a 175 LB Thruster... Later To Make 180

Bill With a 175 LB Thruster... Later To Make 180


Thruster - Barbell will start on the ground.  On 3..2..1..Go, the athlete will place the barbell in front rack position.  With the barbell in front rack position the athlete will squat until the hip crease is below the top of the knee then the move will finish with the athlete fully extended with the barbell overhead.  Knees, hips, shoulders, and elbows must be in full extension.  A squat clean can be utilized whenever the bar is being pulled off of the ground.
Clearly above bar

Clearly above bar






Pull Up - Kipping is allowed.  The athlete starts fully hanging on the bar with shoulders and elbows fully extended.  The movement concludes with the athletes chin above the horizontal plane of the bar.
Matt doing wall ball

Matt doing wall ball




Wall Ball - Athlete starts with the medicine ball in hand.  At the bottom, hip crease must be below the top of the knee.  The movement concludes with the center of the ball contacting the wall at or above the designated line.

Row - Rower must start at 0 calories.  Time finishes when the rower reads 50 calories.
Have fun everyone, and may the best athlete win!

Whole Life Challenge

Friday, April 25th, 2014

A lot goes into health and fitness: Exercise, nutrition, sleep, stress, etc. We talk about these things all the time at The Cave. Sometimes keeping on track is daunting. A few years back to help with this task my friends at CrossFit LA run by Andy Petranek started The Whole Life Challenge. It is a game/contest to help people with the accountability of health. We have decided to get involved this cycle to help our students keep on track. To sign up for the challenge go to our team page at:
http://www.whole.lc/wlcsummer14/pt/thecave

If you sign up today you will receive a $10 discount on the sign up. We have had Cavers do the WLC before with great success. Share this with your friends as well. They do not have to be Cavers to participate, nor do they have to be crazy into fitness. There are varying levels of participation. It may be a good way to get some friends to start thinking about their health and fitness without the full level of commitment that joining The Cave can be.

Healthy Carbs

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

carb_chart2A Paleo Diet (PD) does not mean no carbs or even low carbs for someone who is active (meaning basically a minimum of 30 minutes/day exercise 5x/week). If you’re active, you need energy to burn. The great thing about the PD is that it looks to healthier ways of getting that fuel than the Standard American Diet which leans heavily towards refined grain products, white potatoes, and sugar additives for carbs. So what are healthy PD carbs? And how much do you need each day?

Identifying good carbs

To recognize good carbs, it’s helpful to first understand that carbs break down into three categories: sugar, starch and fiber. The first two provide energy, and fiber, well, just makes life easier! For the most part, carb sources that include a high percentage of fiber are regarded as healthy (click here or on chart above). High fiber carbs equate with a slower absorption rate which reduces blood sugar spikes which means less bad things happening in your body like organ stress, vascular damage, and fatigue, for starts. It’s also good to consume fat and protein with any carb as this also slows absorption and minimizes blood sugar spikes. For example, if you want banana, eat just half with a handful of nuts or dip it in almond butter.

How many carbs per day does an active person need?

Fiber is easy: 14g of fiber per 1,000 calories per day. It’s trickier with the energy-producing carbs as need varies according to personal goals (e.g., weight loss) and what makes you feel best. The Institute of Medicine recommends 112-162g per 1,000 calories per day (45-65% of your total caloric intake). If you follow and feel best on a Zone diet (40:30:30 carb-protein-fat), then a lower 100g per day per 1K calories does the trick. In other words, the amount of carbs needed varies by individual. If you find yourself thinking about sugar the way a 15 yr old boy thinks about sex, or if you feel like you’ve been flattened by a Zamboni after a workout, you may need more carbs. But if you’re looking to lose weight, go Zone.

If you’re ever uncertain about carbs, try looking to Paleo Diet guidelines. There’s a world of healthy choices waiting to be enjoyed!

Parkour Offers an Outlet for Women in Iran

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

After its birth in France, parkour has slowly grown a following here in the States.  But, parkour is no longer a sport for just the west…nor is it popular with just men.

On Fridays, groups of young women across Iran can be seen jumping from rooftops, scaling the graffitied walls of apartment blocks, and catapulting themselves over stairways. They are performing the same  parkour moves we do here in The Cave, but they’re much trickier to execute while wearing a hijab.

As one student from a Tehran parkour group says:  “It gives us courage and helps us release our pent-up energy. It’s great to feel that nothing can stand in your way.”  We’re in full support of the budding community there in Iran and would like to give a massive shout-out to the courageous ladies who are pushing the limits there in more ways than one.

Parkour’s popularity among young women in Iran is soaring, regardless of the bulkier clothing and head coverings Islamic dress codes require them to wear. The outdoor sport, a fast-paced hybrid of gymnastics and martial arts, seems designed to get you out of a fix quickly, which explains its appeal to young Iranians, whose social lives in the strict Islamic republic often require considerable agility. Iran’s female practitioners are running their own threads on Persian-language forums and posting films on-line to showcase their skills.

You can see a great video and read more about these amazing women here:  http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/iranian-women-embrace-parkour-article-1.1731975#ixzz2zeKJtSrO

Keep it up girls, we’re all proud of you!

How Does Exercise Make Us Happier?

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

ropesFor many years, physical exercise has been touted to be a cure for nearly any ailment, from depression to Alzheimer’s disease to Parkinson’s and more.  What would you think if I told you it may even be possible to exercise to happiness?!  Physically active people recover from mild depression more quickly, and physical activity is strongly correlated with good mental health as people age ¹. You have probably heard this before, but in order to truly understand, I felt it was time to get specific and even a little scientific about how exercise affects our brains.

It’s fairly simple to recognize how exercise affects our bodies.  As we exercise, we build more muscle and/or stamina, two elements that are measurable and obvious.  Better fitting pants and heavier weights are clear indicators to understand how effective exercise is for a body.  But, recognizing the benefits of exercise to our brains is not as clear to identify.

What triggers happiness in our brains when we exercise? The short answer is based on the release of endorphins.  But what exactly does that mean?  First, a shallow dive into the science pool…

When we begin exercising, our brains recognize it as stress.  As the heart pressure increases, our brains think we are either fighting an enemy or fleeing from it, commonly identified as the fight-or-flight response.  To protect ourselves and our brains from stress, a protein called BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor) is released.  BDNF is both protective and reparative to our memory neurons and acts as a reset switch. This is why after exercising, we often think more clearly and feel so at ease, even yes, happy.  This experience is by far my favorite part about working out.  That moment when the weight of the world has lifted off my shoulders and I know I can get through anything — even whatever crazy WOD Bo had programmed that day.  Endorphins, another chemical to fight stress, is also released in our brains at this time.  The endorphins’ job is to minimize the discomfort of exercise, blocking any sensations of pain that are even associated with a feeling of euphoria. Overall, during physical activity, our brains are considerably more active than when we are just sitting down or even concentrating mentally.

The important piece to understand is  how we can trigger these processes in an optimal and longer lasting way. Now this is where it all gets very interesting. A recent study from Penn State University found that the level of productivity and happiness on a given work day is based more on if you exercise regularly, and not just on that particular day.

“Those who had exercised during the preceding month but not on the day of testing generally did better on the memory test than those who had been sedentary, but did not perform nearly as well as those who had worked out that morning.”

To get the highest level of happiness and benefits for health, the key is not to become a professional athlete. On the contrary, a much smaller amount of daily exercise is needed to reach the level where happiness and productivity for every day life can peak. New York Times best-selling author Gretchen Reynolds has written a whole book about this subject matter, titled The First 20 Minutes. In the book she states, “The first 20 minutes of moving around, if someone has been really sedentary, provide most of the health benefits. You get prolonged life, reduced disease risk — all of those things come in in the first 20-40 minutes of being active.”  So really, you can relax and don’t have to be on the look-out for the next killer work-out.  (Although I do love them.)  All you have to do is get focused and get moving to gain the full happiness boost every day!

“On exercise days, people’s moods significantly improved after exercising.  Mood stayed about the same on days they didn’t, with the exception of people’s sense of calm which deteriorated.” (University of Bristol)

As a quick last fact, exercise and the subsequent increase of the BDNF proteins in our brains act as a mood enhancer.  So, at the beginning of exercise, the feeling of euphoria is the highest. This means that if you have never exercised before, or not for a long time, your happiness gains will be the highest if you start now.

Exercise and happiness are 2 immensely important things to me.  I’d love to hear your thoughts and opinions too.

This Week’s Happenings in The Cave!

Monday, April 21st, 2014

cave_client-bbq6_webCave Community BBQ!
The Cave is hosting a Client Appreciation BBQ event on May 3rd from 1:00-7:00PM.  All are welcome to attend, though we will be paying extra special attention to our CrossFit community! They have worked very hard this year and deserve some home cookin’ and some fun!
If you’re looking to show off your awesome paleo (or non-paleo) cooking skills, you’re in luck for this is a pot-luck event.  The Cave will provide the bulk of the food and drink, but feel free to bring a dish to share! Come prepared to participate in some fun games and contests for prizes.  Who doesn’t love an old fashioned water balloon toss or three legged race? It is important to note that The Cave will NOT be providing child care at this event, however, children are welcome to attend. We hope to see you there!

Kid’s Night Outkno_hotdog
Next Kid’s Night Out is April 26th.  It’s Sports Night, with hot dogs for dinner!

At Kid’s Night Out your child will have 4 1/2  hours of non-stop activities! Children will play themed games, win prizes, enjoy free play and/or skill work, do crafts, eat a gluten-free meal, and settle in for an age-appropriate movie at the end of the night.

Reserve your space now by e-mailing crystal@inthecave.com or calling (415)927-1630. $45 at the door or $35 in advance. 25% off sibling discount

Fantastic Acrobatic AcroYoga Workshop
May 18th 1:00 - 3:30PM

Combining partner yoga, partner acrobatics, and healing arts, AcroYoga helps build strength, confidence and trust.  Who wants to be fantastic when you could be Acrotastic?!  This workshop is guaranteed to make you work hard and gain skills while having a blast!  Come learn the ways and leave happy!  Space is limited so please register early!   AcroYoga beginner and intermediate levels welcome.

AcroYoga is an incredibly fun way to bust through fears, build trust in one’s abilities, form powerful friendships and large amounts of confidence. Crystal Hatzimichael is both an experienced AcroYoga teacher and a Thai Yoga Massage Therapist. Reserve your space now by e-mailing crystal@inthecave.com or calling (415)927-1630. $35

summer-parkour-campsfinal-1

Summer Camps

If you like the idea of keeping the kids healthily active during the summer (while giving parents a few hours break),  check out our Summer Camp schedule below!  Then be sure to register NOW as these classes fill up FAST!

Summer Camps:


Q&A with The Cave’s Masters Athletes!

Friday, April 18th, 2014
karen-and-martinThis coming weekend, The Cave has 5 athletes competing in the CrossFit Open Masters Competition.  Masters competitors who finished in the top 200 worldwide in their age divisions in the Open are invited to compete in the Masters Qualifier. The Masters Qualifier runs from April 17-21.  At 5 p.m. PT on April 17, four workouts will be released. Competitors will have four days to complete the workouts and submit scores. Our Cave CrossFit competitors are Karen LeFurgy, Rich LeFurgy, Martin Hoe, Mark Anderson, and Bill Berry.  These are amazing athletes that work hard and represent The Cave well.  This is a great opportunity for all of us and The Cave’s greater community to rally around them and cheer them on!  I asked them all a few questions so we could have the opportunity to get to know them better.
How many years have you been doing CrossFit?
I’m not really sure how many years I’ve been doing CrossFit because when I first started I was a reluctant junkie. While I came in and did morning workouts, I also was racing to the Bay Club to finish a kickboxing class or continued running three laps around the marsh mile following class. Only when I relinquished myself to Roger because I wasn’t getting better or stronger and was gaining weight did I truly start CrossFit. He challenged my stubborn side to truly follow the program and I have for at least three and half years.
Why did you start?
I didn’t want to start CrossFit. I wasn’t really looking for a program. I was very happy with the TV over the elliptical, my women’s classes at the Bay Club, running, hiking with the dogs and yoga etc.  But, Rich
The family that CrossFits together sweats together...

The family that CrossFits together sweats together...


had started and suffered an Achilles injury on his right foot. He couldn’t drive. After surgery, while he was recovering, he was dedicated to coming into the gym. I was his driver, I peered in and soon began foundations.

What motivates you to keep going?
Everything about the gym motivates me — the people, the workouts, the process. I would say the balance it provides my life.  But it’s kinda taking the lion’s share of focus right now, luckily my family gets it. Competing as a team hands down motivates me almost as much and trying to keep up with my husband! It is actually my favorite thing to do inside or out of the gym. Considering that, I’d have to say Ashley Martin and Mark motivate me.
What is your favorite CF move?
A clean is hands down my fave for many reasons. First, it’s fast and fun.  But years ago when I first started, heavy weight and poor form lead to an injury and I ripped a tendon in my wrist. I love the fact that we can all come back stronger and I think about that every time I perform a clean.
When was your first competition?
After the first time I competed, I woke up the next morning filled with so much gratitude ’cause you don’t get here on your own. Last year when Martin and I entered a partner competition, we had no idea what we were getting into and to top it off, it was at Diablo CrossFit so we knew their home court bad-asses would be there. We had no idea we would make it to the podium. There are just so many people helping you along the way. It’s never all about you.
Is there a workout/CF move you are hoping not to see next weekend?
I’m a complete dork with heights and skill work.  So I don’t want to see muscle ups, rope climbs etc.
How many years have you been doing CrossFit? Five years this month.
Why did you start? The efficiency and challenge of the workouts.  I heard about it from an ultra-marathoner who suggested it, looked up CrossFit in Marin and called to schedule some introduction classes.
What motivates you to keep going? I like the results, the challenge to keep getting better and the purity of the methodology and the movements.
What is your favorite CF move? cleans
Did you play any other sports? High School football and track
Favorite quote? “My girl is stronger than you.” (Best quote EVER!)
Is there a workout/CF move you are hoping not to see next weekend? Not going to go there.
Martin and Mark cycling box jumps

Martin and Mark cycling box jumps


Martin Hoe:
How many years have you been doing CrossFit? Why did you start? I started in my backyard in January 2008, after being inspired by a friend at a Christmas party who said to me, “You look a little chubby, you need to get some exercise”.
What is your favorite CF move? Leaving.
Did you play any other sports? I wanted to play team sports in school but no-one would pick me, so as an adult I have, at various times, been fanatical about mountain biking, snowboarding and surfing.
Favorite quote: “Two things are infinite: The universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.” — Albert Einstein
Is there a workout/CF move you are hoping not to see next weekend?
Handstand walk
Mark Anderson:
How many years have you been doing CrossFit? Five years
Why did you start? I was looking for a more efficient and effective approach to training.  I discovered XFIT through a friend in Santa Cruz. I was addicted after my first session with Roger.
What motivates you to keep going? The never ending mental and physical challenges.
What is your favorite CF move? Muscle up
Do you play any other sports? I do play and coach ice hockey.
Favorite quote? Keeping it close to home:  ” Just be stronger and faster.”  — Coach Bo
Is there a workout/CF move you are hoping not to see next weekend? Heavy snatch
How many years have you been doing CrossFit?
I began CrossFit 71/2 years ago.
Why did you start?
Bill going for a max.

Bill going for a max.


I began CrossFit because I was beginning to feel old and I was either going to work at getting fit or fat.  I wanted to be able to play with my grandchildren as I grew older and did not want to be exhausted after only being with them a few minutes.  I also wanted to be able to go out with my children and be active with them and not be worn out after a short while.  Last September I saw all this fulfilled when we went to Outer Banks, North Carolina and I was able to play in the ocean with my children and grandchildren for as long as any of them wanted to be there.
What motivates you to keep going?
There are several reasons I keep going.  The results I have experienced are a key motivation.  My physical life has changed radically as a result of CrossFit.  I have also found a place to compete on a regular basis with myself and others along with preparing for the Games.  I had let this part of my life die as far as athletic endeavors.  The final reason is I love the people.  My greatest desire is for the people to know I love them as Christ has loved me.
What is your favorite CF move? My favorites are the Olympic lifts, clean and snatch.
Did you play any other sports? Throughout my growing up years I played baseball and basketball and this continued through high school.  I played some tennis in my 30’s.  Both snow skied and water skied for a good portion of my adult life as well.
Favorite quote? Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but with humility of mind regard one another as more important than yourselves; 4 do not merely look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others. 5 Have this attitude in yourselves which was also in Christ Jesus, 6 who, although He existed in the form of God, did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men.8 Being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. The Apostle Paul (Philippians 2:3-8)
Is there a workout/CF move you are hoping not to see next weekend?
There are too many to name, but if I have to choose on it would be “toes to bar.”
I’ve had the delight of working out with these athletes, even being coached by one.  I hope you’ll all join me this weekend cheering them on!

What to Bring to a Paleo Barbecue!

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

What to Bring to a Paleo Barbecue!
slaw1I love a party and especially enjoy making food to share, so reading Dana’s post yesterday about the upcoming Cave barbecue got me thinking about what I might bring. My mind jumped immediately to the coleslaw recipe below that I got from my sister-in-law last year and have been making just about every week since. It makes tons and is equally great for a summer soiree or a virtuous snack because despite the quantity, it disappears almost as quickly from the fridge as it does from a party, it’s so delicious!

Slaw

  • half a head of a small red cabbage
  • half a head of a small Savoy cabbage (alternately you can use 3 - 4 cups shredded Napa or Green cabbage)
  • 3 medium to large carrots, peeled & trimmed
  • 2 ripe red bell peppers, washed and seeded (omit if strict Paleo as these are nightshades)
  • 1 bunch cilantro

Dressing

  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar (for strict Paleo use 2 T fresh lemon juice and 2 T fresh lime juice plus 1 T lemon and/or lime zest)
  • 1/4 cup tamari (for strict Paleo use coconut aminos, can be found at Whole Foods)
  • 1 T prepared mustard

1. In a food processor fitted with a slicing blade, thinly slice both cabbages. Transfer to a large bowl.
2. Swap slicing blade with a grating blade; grate carrots and transfer to bowl with cabbages.
3. Slice bell pepper into easy bite-size bits; add to cabbage.
4. Loosely chop cilantro and add to the big bowl. Mix well.
5. Combine dressing ingredients in a jar with tight-fitting lid. Shake well and pour one third of dressing into bowl at a time, mixing well after each addition and stopping when flavor suits your taste. If any dressing is left over at this point, save to drizzle later over individual servings as desired. Will keep a week in the fridge, but I guarantee it will disappear well before then!