The Cave
Parkour
Fitness Evolved
Gymnastics
Weight Lifting

The Cave Blog

Easy Grilled Chicken Satay

August 6th, 2014 by karen

sataySomewhere along the lines I picked this recipe up and love it. Can’t remember where; not originally mine but adapted it over time to be Paleo and make it constantly. Don’t even bother with the skewers anymore. Grab a slice before a workout and/or after one, it’s great in school lunches, packs well for a plane ride. It’s easy. It’s good. And it’s real food.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (make sure you get one that does not have wheat protein!)
  • 3-4 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon tamari or coconut aminos
  • 1 minced stalk lemon grass
  • 1 tablespoon fresh minced ginger
  • 1 tablespoon crushed garlic
  • 1 tablespoon EVOO
  • 1 pound boneless skinless chicken breast

Directions

Combine all the above ingredients except chicken in a zip lock bag.

Cut chicken on the diagonal in roughly half to three quarter inch strips and add to zip lock. Seal and shake to thoroughly coat chicken.

Place ziplock bag in fridge for an hour or two to marinate and when ready, heat grill at high temp, place chicken strips evenly on grilling surface and cook about 4 minutes on each side.

Eat immediately and refrigerate leftovers for a few days.

How long does it take to improve in CrossFit?

August 6th, 2014 by Dana

Below is a re-post from the Beyond The White Board Blog — y’know, the app we all use to track our fitness. Over the past 6 years, the folks at BTWB analyzed fitness level data from over 65,000 athletes, in an effort to increase the data driven knowledge available in our CrossFit community. As does any sport, CrossFit has it’s own unique improvement curves and it was interesting to see how my years in the sport applied to this study.
I’d love to hear your thoughts on it below. I hope you enjoy this article as much as I did.
How long does it take to improve in CrossFit?
Almost a year ago, we launched our “Fitness Level” and “Weaknesses” features as part of our new Analyze section. These features were designed to give athletes more information and analysis about their workouts and their physical capacity. For every athlete on our site, we calculate their “Fitness Level”, which is a single number from 1-99 that represents their overall Fitness. This is a single number that captures how an athletes performance stacks up to the rest of the community.
julie-foucher-web-4

Definition of Fitness vs How Fit You Are

Greg Glassman defined fitnessand with it started a fitness revolution. However, it was still tough to figure out how Fit an athlete was at any given time. We set out and solved this problem withFitness Level. Now, by performing a hand-full of workouts we can accurately calculate how fit an athlete is at any given time. For example, Julie Foucher, CrossFit® Games veteran who has posted over 4,000 results on beyond the whiteboard over the years, has a Fitness Level of 95. As you will see, we’ve found that games caliber athletes need to be at this level. This insight opened the door to many other questions, mainly, “”How long will it take to improve in CrossFit?”.
Fitness Level Overview
Improving Your Fitness

On average, it takes about 5-6 months to improve your Fitness Level by 10 levels.

bar_graph
New & Intermediate CrossFitters can improve quickly
When you are fairly new to CrossFit® you can improve at a pretty quick rate. If you’re currently between 1-60, stay committed and consistent because you have a chance to raise your Fitness Level by 20 levels per year. In fact, on average, it takes 19 Months to improve from a level 50 to a level 80. In short, eat well and get to your CrossFit Affiliate a few times a week.
Advanced CrossFitters
On average, it takes about 5-6 months to improve your Fitness Level by 10 levels. This rate holds true until you get to Level 80. Going from level 80 to 90 takes over 8 months, on average, which is 45% longer than it takes to go from 70 to 80. To make Regionals, you need to be near a level 90.

To make Regionals, you need to be near a level 90.

Elite CrossFitters
To get to a level 95, which is near Games level, it takes about 6 additional months. As your level gets higher and higher, it becomes more and more difficult to continue increasing your level. The difference between one or two levels at the top is huge.
Nutrition, Sleep and Recovery
“I have really prioritized my goal of training for the CrossFit Games and with that comes prioritizing sleep, nutrition, and recovery,” Julie Foucher recently told us. Nutrition and sleep play a big factor in increasing your Fitness Level. Although they might not have the same diets, it seems most advanced and elite CrossFitters pay attention to how they eat and sleep. If you’re looking for more information a great place to start is Zone Meal Plans or talking to a trainer at a CrossFit Affiliate.

“I have really prioritized my goal of training for the CrossFit Games and with that comes prioritizing sleep, nutrition, and recovery,” -Julie Foucher

Case Study
Below is a Fitness Level histogram of Nick Robles. In 2012 he finished 123rd in the Open for the SoCal Region with a Fitness Level of 82. In 2013 he finished 95th with a Fitness Level of 86. This year he finished 34th with a Fitness Level of 88, earning him a qualifying spot at Regionals. It took him 16.5 months to increase his Fitness Level from a 50 to an 80, which is slightly above average. It took him another 8.5 months to go from an 80 to a 90, which is just about average.
Nick-Robles-FL-History
The Novice Effect
This phenomenon is similar to what Mark Rippetoe calls the “Novice Effect”. In the first 2 to 3 years of training, you see fast improvement. But as time moves on, improvement slows and it often takes more extra work and advanced programming to get to the higher levels. He designed this chart specifically for Strength development, but the data suggests that there is a similar effect going on in CrossFit® training as well.
Novice-Effect-Rippetoe

Source: “The Novice Effect” by Mark Rippetoe

As you can see in the above analysis, it takes quite a few years of consistent training to get to a competitive level in CrossFit®. Keep in mind though, that it is getting harder every year. If someone is just starting now, in 5 years the bar will have moved even higher. We still believe that making Regionals is an attainable goal for some of our top members, but the possibility of a brand new member getting there anytime soon is getting a lot less likely.
Theoretical Fitness Journey
Combining all the data discussed above here is a theoretical journey in CrossFit. We are confident that if you stay consistent with training and eat/sleep/rest well you will be able to increase your Fitness Level at a similar rate. Although in the beginning you will definitely see results and become a lot fitter, it will take some time to become very fit(Level 80+). That’s the reality and sadly it’s contrary to a lot of other fitness claims. In Fitness, just like life, the journey is the reward. Enjoy it.
fitness_journey

In Fitness, just like life, the journey is the reward. Enjoy it.

Notes

To answer the questions in this article, we looked at Fitness Level data from over 65,000 athletes over the past 6 years. Because of the breadth and depth of our dataset, we can pull out some pretty awesome time series trends. We will continue publishing these types of articles in an effort to increase the data-drvien knowledge available in our community. We hope this will help further the evolution and improvement of our fitness methodologies.

PALEO 101…and why I hate the word Paleo. by Jaime Jereb

August 5th, 2014 by Jaime

One more time…
I want a burger.
“Yeah.”
With all the stuff.
“Yeah.”
The meat. The veggies. The mustard…
“Yeah.”
I just don’t want the bun.
“Let me repeat.  It’s a burger, no cheese, lettuce, tomato, mustard…,”

Right.
“Did you want your bun toasted?”
Ugh…Yes! Like your brain.  Thanks.
Before it was cool to be gluten-free, these were my conversations.  That or “oh, you must be on that Atkins Diet.”

Really? I must? Did I just order a bag of Splenda and 42 Kraft single slices?

BURGER.  NO BUN.   PLEASE!!!

Last week you heard me talk about plain ol’ food. Real food that is. If you haven’t read that blog, go click on the pretty blue letters and read up.  If you have and are curious about learning the paleo basics, then sit back, grab a hunk of meat and continue to learn the basics behind the original human diet.

The Paleolithic (paleo) Diet has come a long way. A couple million years to be exact.  Early humans hunted and fished.  Early humans gathered and foraged. Early humans did not drive to McDonald’s for their latest freaky creation.

McLobster? Really?

Up until 10,000 years ago, the dawn of agriculture, we were eating what nature provided:  Animals, seasonal fruits, vegetables, roots, nuts, seeds and we drank water.  You might better know this stuff as food.  Everything was organic, whole and real. Animals were healthy and lean from running around in sunshine and eating what nature intended them to eat, not what we force them to eat.  We were healthy, muscular, strong, had good skin, teeth and vision.  If we made it out of childhood, not eaten by a sharp toothed cat, and stayed clear of infection, we actually lived a relatively long life.

Our best understanding to date leads us to believe that for millions of years:

  • Nothing was processed.

  • Nothing was cultivated.

  • Nothing was harvested.

  • Nothing was domesticated.

WE SIMPLY ATE:

The aforementioned foods were literally how human beings not only survived but thrived. So, it makes sense that the Paleo diet is not a fad but rather the way our bodies were evolutionarily designed to eat.

WARNING:  THIS MAY BUM SOME OF YOU OUT.

I hate to point out the obvious (no I don’t) but this also means that for millions of years, we did NOT eat grains, beans, legumes, Pop Tarts, Cheerios, Snickers, bread, peanut butter, Twizzlers, dairy, Applebee’s, Sour Patch Kids, OR drink alcohol, coffee, soda, Snapple, smoke or chew gum.

Is it any wonder that since being introduced to these foods, across the board our health has decreased dramatically?

NO!

Am I saying because these foods were not available then that we should not consume them now?

NO…ISH

Take them out, see how you feel.  Bring them back.  If they hurt you, Pop Tarts and PB&J isn’t for you. Remember the “If a caveman didn’t eat it, we shouldn’t eat it” mantra?  Let’s not get too hung up on that. We are not cavemen.  We have Facebook for God’s sake.  Plus, I imagine that if a caveman saw a bag of Oreos laying around, he would happily kill his entire tribe as to not be interrupted mid-gorge. I think we all know I totally would.

Food was scarce.  They ate what they could.  It just so happens that the food available were animals and plants.  From an evolutionary stand point, we just haven’t evolved to the point of being able to physically process more modern foods like dairy, grains, beans and sugars. And some foods we just shouldn’t eat ever, like McLobsters, high fructose corn syrup and gluten <—-click on that to learn the problems with gluten.

Think of it like this:  When you change your dog’s food, what does the bag say? ‘Introduce slowly.’  If not, you know damn well what’s going to happen to that IKEA Yin Yang rug.  In our case, there just hasn’t been enough time.  As mentioned in the real food blog, we have changed our diet more in 60 years than in the past million. That’s a flick in earth’s history.  It’s nothing.  And while you may not be scooting with Sparky on that IKEA rug, collectively, and to some degree, we are ALL being affected by this modern westernized diet. <——- download the pdf file on this page.

#FUNTIMESWITHMODERNFOOD

coronary heart disease

o b e s i t y

hypertension

type 2 diabetes

epithelial cell cancers

autoimmune disease

osteoporosis

#IT’SNOTLOOKINGGOODPEOPLE and #WHATAREHASHTAGSANYWAY?

I could go on and on with the science, case studies, big words, more hash tagging, but why do that when I can insert a cool info graph? Reading is so much better with pictures.

We get a lot of questions from customers about Paleo — why we don’t use bread and if The Farmer’s accent is real are just conversation starters. (Anyone who says arse instead of ass has to be legit, right?).  Hopefully, this gave you at least a brief (and believe me, this is brief) introduction into Paleo basics and the reasoning behind it.  It’s a good place to start, especially if you’re experiencing digestive ailments, lack of energy, weight problems or full blown disease.

6 TIPS TO GET STARTED

#1.  Go here. Here. And here. Learn as much as you can.

#2.  Don’t over complicate it.  Start with the basics.  Try new things. If you get lost, go back to the basics.

#3.  If you still need help transitioning into a Paleo lifestyle, there are PLENTY of recipe resources and books to help you along the way.  To name a few:

  • Chrissy Gower’s Paleo Slowcooker book.

  • Sarah Fragoso’s Everyday Paleo

  • And one of my favorites, wait for it….wait for it……PALEO HAPPY HOUR by the fabulous Kelly Milton.  If delicious happy hour drinks and small plates are your thing (and why wouldn’t they be?) , you’re going to need this book.  It hasn’t hit the shelves yet, but the site Paleo Gurls Kitchen has plenty to get you started.  I’m still drooling over her avocado margarita.  Yep, that happened!

#4.  If you’re interested in trying out the real Paleo diet, awesome!  But, give yourself a chance to let it work.  Don’t just stop eating bread for a week and expect to lose 40 pounds.  Try it for 30 days and be true to it.

#5.  Be aware of Paleo traps.  There are a ton of misleading information out there claiming that “this is Paleo” and “that is Paleo.”  See #1, get educated and don’t forget #2 -  stick to the basics if you get lost.

#6.  Ask me for help!!  If you are questioning how to get on track with eating real food, Paleo or anything Jaime Jereb approved, contact me for a nutrition consult. I promise I won’t yell at you (in life or in all caps).    jaime@inthecave.com

Are you Paleo? A real food lover?  We’d LOVE to hear your experiences, tips and feedback. Leave a comment below. We sure appreciate you reading!


This Week In The Cave

August 4th, 2014 by Dana

photo-10Summer Camps
Summer is winding down, but it’s not too late to treat your kids to a week of summer camp at The Cave! If you like the idea of keeping the kids healthily active during the summer (while giving parents a few hours break),  check out our Summer Camp schedule below!
Summer Camps Date:
Gymnastics:  August 11-15
Parkour:  August 18-22

REGISTER ON-LINE OR CALL (415)927-1630.

CrossFit Trainer’s Gymnastics Seminar

You don’t want to miss this! Spend 3 hours with Roger Harrell - founder of the CrossFit Gymnastics Certification program - learning how to properly teach gymnastics fundamentals in a CrossFit program. Detailed progressions will be covered. Key safety concerns will be addressed specifically geared toward teaching gymnastics movements to adults. Click here to register.

This seminar is coupled with the Athlete’s Gymnastics Seminar.Member’s cost for both Trainer’s and Athlete’s seminars is $90, non-member cost is $100. Call (415) 250-9710 to sign up for BOTH seminars and receive the special pricing.

CrossFit Athlete’s Gymnastics Seminar

Spend 3 hours with Roger Harrell - founder of the CrossFit Gymnastics Certification program - learning gymnastics movements. This seminar is focused on proper and efficient execution of key gymnastics elements. Get started or improve your technique on a variety of movements. Learn how these skills truly break down to work toward mastery. Floor, rings and parallettes will be covered in detail with an introduction to other gymnastics apparatus. Learn some key techniques to dramatically improve your efficiency and enable performance of skills you thought unattainable.Click here to register.

This seminar is coupled with the Trainer’s Gymnastics Seminar. Member’s cost for both Athlete’s and Trainer’s seminars is $90, non-member cost is $100. Call (415) 250-9710 to sign up for BOTH seminars and receive the special pricing.

wod_recovery_yoga2-1Yoga at The Cave
Starting the first week in August, we’ll be adding 3 new classes to our schedule:
WOD Recovery Yoga (Post CrossFit Yoga) Monday and Thursday 10-11am
Athletic Vinyasa Flow Yoga Wednesday 12:00-1:00pm

More information can be found on our website: http://www.inthecave.com/other_classes


Fall Class Registration

Yes, it is only mid-summer, but it’s already that time to begin planning for the Fall!  Classes fill up super fast in the Fall, so now is the time to organize your children’s schedules and sign them up!  Our Fall Schedule can be seen here on-line and you can sign up by calling The Cave at (415) 927-1630.

Yoga is coming to the Cave!

August 2nd, 2014 by Dana

steph_ring-591.jpgThe Cave is excited to announce 2 new Yoga classes expertly instructed by Stephanie Ring.

Wednesday 12-1pm Athletic Vinyasa Flow:

Athletic Vinyasa Flow is a fast paced yoga class designed to challenge athletes and yogis physically and mentally. Each class will focus on strength, core stability, flexibility and postures to help improve overall athletic performance.

Monday and Thursday 10am-11amWOD Recovery Yoga (Post CrossFit Yoga):

WOD Recovery Yoga (Post CrossFit Yoga)introduces athletes to another form of movement designed to improve their WOD performance and overall fitness. Each class will include poses and transitions to improve performance in 5 of the 10 general physical skills crucial to overall fitness: Flexibility, Coordination, Agility, Balance and Accuracy. Classes will be sequenced to improve mobility in foundational movements like squats and designed to help unwind the body from previous workouts.

Private and Semi Privates

Available for private instruction Monday through Saturday. Email steph@inthecave.com to set up appointment for private or semi private yoga classes.

Stephanie Ring, creator of Endure Yoga, is an athlete who absolutely loves yoga.

She created Endure Yoga to help athletes improve their athletic performance. This is a specialized yoga system in which yoga classes are specifically designed around the athlete and their specific goals and the type of physical activity that they are pursuing. Classes help to maintain flexibility and fitness and mirror the builds, recovery and taper periods in a training season.

The sumo deadlift high pull (SDHP)

August 1st, 2014 by Dana

photo-8You may remember my article “For the love of all things heavy Deadlift” describing the deadlift in detail and explaining what an efficient lift it is. This article builds on that information and adds another element to that movement, with a high pull.

The sumo deadlift high pull (SDHP) is an explosive compound movement that develops tremendous power in the posterior chain. It primarily strengthens the hamstrings, glutes, lower back and upper traps. The SDHP is a great movement to also help improve your pull during the clean, in addition to full-body coordination and explosive power.
The SDHP is similar to the traditional deadlift but has a wider stance. The SDHP stance, called the sumo stance, (clever, huh?), is wider than shoulder stance with your toes pointed out about 30 degrees. Stability is extremely important, so make sure your stance isn’t so wide that your knees are pointing or caving in.
The SDHP also uses a narrower grip as compared to the traditional deadlift. The hands are placed near the middle of the bar, which allows more flexibility to pull the bar all the way up to the chin. A good way to figure out where to place your hands is to center them on the bar with approximately two thumb distances between them (touch the tips of your thumbs together and then grip the bar with an overhand grip).
Otherwise, everything else is the same as in the deadlift – the hips are above the knees, weight is in the heels, the bar is in close to the shins, the shins are vertical or near-vertical, and the shoulders are slightly in front of the bar, placing it directly underneath the scapular spines (under the tops of your shoulder blades). Finally, the shoulder blades are retracted and the back is held tightly with the chest up, maintaining the lumbar arch.
Before lifting the bar, take a deep breath and hold it to help support the torso. The abs, glutes, hamstrings and shoulder blades should be contracted tightly. The body should be tense against the bar to prevent jerking the bar off the floor and to pre-activate the muscles.
The lift begins by driving the heels into the ground and explosively opening the hips. The hips must reach full extension before anything else happens. This means that you reach a full standing position. Thinking of making yourself tall can help. The arms must stay absolutely straight, without any pull. Bending the arms early will decrease your ability to transfer force to the bar.
Once the hips are fully extended, the shrug begins. The shoulders need to begin shrugging up fluidly with the end of the hip extension, so there is no decrease in bar speed. Try to think about including the shrug to make sure you don’t forget it and to help make it more automatic. The arms must stay absolutely straight, without any pull.
After the shoulders shrug, the arms can now begin to bend.  The goal is to let the bar float, so you should think about trying to toss the bar to the ceiling. Of course, this won’t happen because of the weight on the bar.
During the lift, the feet should maintain contact with the ground the entire time. At the top of the pull you should be at triple extension – the hips, knees and ankles should all be straight.
The weight should just fall back down to the ground, rather than trying to slowly lower it. However, keep your grip on the bar in order to control it and prevent it from bouncing away dangerously. Be aware to not round your back on the way down.
Please remember to check and reset your form between reps, and always remember form under fatigue.
Train hard.

A Real Food Recipe

July 31st, 2014 by karen

perfecthbeJaime’s great post and Colleen’s simply beautiful photograph* have inspired me to keep it as real as it gets this week with a recipe for hard boiled eggs. Healthy fast food doesn’t have to be an oxymoron. Cook up a bunch of these puppies for grab-and-go convenience all week.

Ingredients

  • Eggs. Up to as many as comfortably fit in the pot you use.
  • Salt.
  • Water.

Directions

Place eggs in a pot, then run cold tap water to cover eggs 1 inch over and add 1 teaspoon of salt. (Note: starting with cold water lets you heat the egg more slowly, which keeps the whites from getting rubbery, and adding salt prevents egg whites from spilling out of small cracks that can form in the cooking process.)

Bring to boil at medium heat. As soon as the water boils, turn off the heat but leave the pot on the stove and cover with good-fitting lid. Leave the eggs in the hot water for ten to fifteen minutes. It is important you do not start the timer until you turn off the heat. Too much time will make the eggs discolored and smelly, while too little time will cause them to be runny. 

After 10 or 15 minutes, plunge eggs into cold water to arrest the cooking process.

These will keep in the fridge at least a week. Grab one before you go to your workout at The Cave for quick post work-out protein. Pack them in school lunches peeled for no mess, unpeeled for more fun. Make a quick sauce of equal parts Paleo mayonnaise (great recipe in the current edition of The Cave cookbook available in the office) and your favorite mustard. When you run out of hard boiled eggs, make some more. No excuses for not having quick real food on hand, guys!

*When Colleen Donaldson isn’t working out at The Cave, one of her many talents is professional photography. She took the above picture for the next edition of Cooking in The Cave which should be available this holiday season and will include tons of fantastic real food recipes and awesome photographs!

What Is Real Food? by Jaime Jereb

July 29th, 2014 by Jaime

10:45pm Tossing, turning, not sleeping.  ”Real food…..real food…..real food.  How to explain real food…”  Mmmmmm, fooooooood…

11:03pm Hunched over my sink like a rat — chowing, mowing — definitely not sleeping.

“Real food…..real food…..real food.”  Mid-bite and with possibly two chicken legs hanging out of my mouth (true story), it suddenly dawns on me:  I actually have to explain what “real food” is!  WTH?  How did our world get so screwed up that there is anything other than real food even available?

11:17pm Wardrobe change — somehow my chicken legs cascaded down my shirt.  I can’t write while smelling like chicken; I have enough distractions.  But, before I change my shirt, I should probably reorganize my bar.  How can I write with my vodka sitting next to the bourbon?

11:34pm Bar alphabetized? Check.

11:51pm Somewhere between The Beam and Kettle One, I come up with the best explanation of all time.

REAL FOOD = NOT CRAP

Said differently: REAL FOOD = NOT KRAP

In another language: EALRAY OODFAY = OTNAY APCRAY

If pig latin doesn’t clearly explain it, try this:

What is REAL FOOD? Real food is food that is as close to it’s natural state as possible.  Starts with a single ingredient, ends with a single ingredient. Simple. No chemicals. No hormones. No antibiotics. Happy. From the earth.  From something that eats things that come from the earth or eats things that eat the things that come from the earth. Nourishing.

BENEFITS OF REAL FOOD

  • It tastes better.

  • We feel better.

  • You look better.

  • It’s what our bodies need and nothing they don’t.

  • It’s the only medicine without side effects.

  • Humans are designed to eat this way.

  • Your kids will back-talk less and listen more.  Truth!

What is FAKE FOOD? Fake food is “food” that is a far cry from nature’s intention. Processed beyond recognition. Starts with a single ingredient, ends with multiple ingredients comprised mostly of words and chemicals you can’t spell or pronounce. Complex.  From the lab.  From a scientist who works in the lab being told to create something that resembles real food because if the public knew what it really was, they wouldn’t touch it.  Addictive.

BENEFITS OF FAKE FOOD

None.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO KNOW THE DIFFERENCE

Our bodies are designed to be perfectly functioning bad-ass machines.  In nature’s design, our hearts will never skip a beat, our lungs will never forget to breathe, our bones will never lose integrity.  So, do you want to keep moving, breathing and living?  Then fuel with quality food, Dummy!  Simply stated: Eat crap, krap or apcray on a regular basis (or hang with Carrot Top) and you’ll eventually become fat, sick or dead.  The end.

Am I exaggerating?  I don’t think so.  Just look at our country’s growing epidemic of disease, cancer, obesity and the whole slew of existing ailments.  In the ancient past, even as little as 100 years ago, we simply did not have these problems in mass quantities like we do today.  Is it any coincidence that our food system has changed more in 50 years than in the past 10,000? 100,000?  I think not.

BUT, IT SAID IT WAS GOOD FOR ME!

Big food companies LOVE to confuse the consumer. “It’s healthy!”  “It’s low fat!” “It’ll save your life!” “This box of cereal will actually raise your children and pay for their education.” Don’t fall for it folks.  Anything claiming to be good for you is most likely bad for you and certainly not a real food.  If you don’t believe me, walk up to a head of lettuce and see what it has to say.  You might be there a while.

A REAL FOOD VS. FAKE FOOD MEAL — SIMILAR, BUT OH SO DIFFERENT.

I’m dumbfounded by the complexities of simple real food being stripped of it’s natural vitamins, minerals, and nutrients just to be fortified with man-made crap from Dexter’s laboratory.  Am I the only one who finds this a little nutty?  Oatmeal is a great example.  In it’s natural state,  oatmeal is one ingredient: Oats.  How about adding some apples,  cinnamon and grass fed butter for a total of 4 ingredients.  4!  That’s a real food meal.

Apparently that wasn’t enough.  Here’s the other version that is found in most cupboards across the country:

Ingredients: Whole grain rolled oats (with oat bran), sugar, dehydrated apples (treated with sulfur dioxide, sodium sulfite, and sodium bisulfite to promote color retention), salt, cinnamon, calcium carbonate (a source of calcium), natural flavors, citric acid, guar gum, niacinamide, vitamin A palmitate, reduced iron, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, thiamin mononitrate, folic acid.

How many ingredients is that??  I mean, at least there’s that amazing health claim “Reduces cholesterol!” Not to mention, who wouldn’t want to look like that sexy Quaker?

MORE THINGS TO SCARE THE BEJEEZUS OUT OF YOU


SO WHERE DID WE GO WRONG? OH, I DON’T KNOW…


Somebody is hungry all right and it’s name is Big Food Corp.  Somewhere down the road (around 60ish years ago) food developers decided that it was much cheaper and easier with higher profit margin to start lacing our food with hydrogenated oils, chemicals, preservatives, artificial colors and everything you can imagine to make them taste good and stupid addictive.  Remember Lay’s famous slogan, “Bet you can’t eat just one…”  NO kidding we can’t, because it’s drug-like reactions on our systems makes it impossible to stop.  We are already predisposed to craving salt, fat and sugar.  Thanks Frito Lay, but you’re just not helping the situation.  Real food doesn’t do that.  Do you recall going back to the kitchen and eating 2,3,4,10 apples, chicken breasts or heads of chard?  No way!  Nature is no dummy.  Real food is designed to nourish and be done.

SO WHAT DO WE DO?

We get smart!!  We get educated!! We stop being lazy and stop making excuses!! We spend an extra 10 seconds and think about what we’re about to shove in our Dorito hole, and it better not be Doritos either. We ask questions. We do our research.  Not all animals, not all veggies, not all food is created equal.  Even if it’s a single ingredient, know where it’s coming from and know who grew it. That’s where farmers’ markets, co-ops and  CSA’s come in handy.  They source from legit local farms and ranchers.

If you choose to shop at grocery stores rather than haul a wagon to Farmer’s Market, check out this handy flow chart!

Remember:  Keep it simple. Real food is as easy as it gets.  Take a meat. Take a plant.  Cook. Consume.

This week in The Cave

July 28th, 2014 by Dana

A fantastic group of guys

A fantastic group of guys

Congratulations to Coach Bill!

Bill Berry made a HUGE statement at the CrossFit Games last week!  He came in 14th in the Master division, and showed the true spirit of a champion!  Great job Bill!  We loved cheering you on and watching you get after it.  We are all so  proud of you!!  Roger’s series of recaps of Bill’s events begins here: http://www.inthecave.com/blog/?p=10830

It is with deep sadness that coach Bill is leaving us to be closer to his family on the east coast.    We’ll be having a goodbye party for him at The Cave on Saturday, August 2nd starting at 5:30pm.  Please join us in celebrating Bill and showing our love for him.  Also, please take a moment to read his farewell letter here: http://www.inthecave.com/blog/?p=10760
wod_recovery_yoga2-1Yoga is coming to The Cave
Starting the first week in August, we’ll be adding 3 new classes to our schedule:

WOD Recovery Yoga (Post CrossFit Yoga)      Monday and Thursday 10-11am

Athletic Vinyasa Flow Yoga      Wednesday 12:00-1:00pm

More information can be found on our website:   http://www.inthecave.com/other_classes

Fall Class Registrationgroup_photo
Yes, it is only mid-summer, but it’s already that time to begin planning for the Fall!  Classes fill up super fast in the Fall, so now is the time to organize your children’s schedules and sign them up!  Our Fall Schedule can be seen here on-line and you can sign up by calling The Cave at (415) 927-1630.
muscleup-goodCrossFit Trainer’s Gymnastics Seminar
You don’t want to miss this! Spend 3 hours with Roger Harrell - founder of the CrossFit Gymnastics Certification program - learning how to properly teach gymnastics fundamentals in a CrossFit program. Detailed progressions will be covered. Key safety concerns will be addressed specifically geared toward teaching gymnastics movements to adults. Click here to register.
This seminar is coupled with the Athlete’s Gymnastics Seminar. Member’s cost for both Trainer’s and Athlete’s seminars is $90, non-member cost is $100. Call (415) 250-9710 to sign up for BOTH seminars and receive the special pricing.
CrossFit Athlete’s Gymnastics Seminar
Spend 3 hours with Roger Harrell - founder of the CrossFit Gymnastics Certification program - learning gymnastics movements. This seminar is focused on proper and efficient execution of key gymnastics elements. Get started or improve your technique on a variety of movements. Learn how these skills truly break down to work toward mastery. Floor, rings and parallettes will be covered in detail with an introduction to other gymnastics apparatus. Learn some key techniques to dramatically improve your efficiency and enable performance of skills you thought unattainable. Click here to register.
This seminar is coupled with the Trainer’s Gymnastics Seminar. Member’s cost for both Athlete’s and Trainer’s seminars is $90, non-member cost is $100. Call (415) 250-9710 to sign up for BOTH seminars and receive the special pricing.

2014 Games Friday Recap

July 25th, 2014 by Roger

First day at the CrossFit Games didn’t disappoint. The individual and team events tested the athletes thoroughly. I won’t go into the details of the workouts. They can all be viewed here on the games site. The “Frantasy” workout was one of the most grueling team events I’ve seen. Most of you all know what pushing a sled feels like from the prowler pushes. Now, go do Fran as hard as you can, then push the prowler around a bunch. Or, start by pushing the prowler around, then do Fran, then push the prowler some more. That is pretty much what the team event was like. So each team member had to do some variant of Fran and push the sled a total of 200 yards. Shortly after those two events were done, they had to do a team total max deadlift, followed by… wait for it… Another sled push. The team athletes are going to be hurting tomorrow.

The most impressive feat of the day had to be Camille doing the pull up phase of the 21-15-9 complex completely unbroken. She was the only individual (male or female) to do this. So she completed 8 pull ups to 7 chest to bar pull ups to 6 bar muscle ups unbroken. Then again with 6-5-4 and 4-3-2 respectively.